{From Dingy & Dirty to Fun & Flirty ~ Yellow Dresser Reveal}

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Today, I’ll reveal to you how I turned a very dingy and dirty curbside find into a stunningly fun and flirty storage dresser for my family room!  You can read about my trash picking adventure here, but how I acquired this gem is not nearly as exciting as how I transformed it with just a can of paint and some new hardware.

  1.  Clean & Prep

The dresser sat in my garage for a while until I found the time to clean it thoroughly.  Notice my supplies included my daughter’s video monitor.  Gotta love nap time.  IMG_8600I first removed the drawer pulls and tossed them because I knew I wanted to replace them with something stylish and fun.  Then, I vacuumed the loose dirt out of the tiny grooves with my hand-held vacuum.  Finally, I wiped it down really well using some microfiber cloths dampened with a solution of very warm water mixed with a couple cap-fulls of TSP.  It’s a great product to remove dirt, grime, and stuck on grease or goo that sometimes gets caked onto furniture.  I use TSP any time I want to paint furniture since it removes anything that might prevent paint from adhering to the piece.  Another tip is to always use gloves when handling a chemical. Your skin is like a sponge, so treat it accordingly.  Let the piece dry thoroughly before painting.  I usually wait at least a few hours or the next day.

2.  Paint

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I took advantage of a nice sunny day and painted each of the drawers with 2 to 3 coats of CeCe Caldwell’s Carolina Sun Yellow, purchased online from Glitter Farm.  Chalk paint dries very quickly, so on this warm breezy day, I finished all of the coats in no time at all.  Just look how bright and cheerful this yellow is!  I admit, this color is definitely not going to be everyone’s cup of tea, but I love that it’s the first thing I see when I walk into my house.  It’s one of my happy colors for sure! IMG_4500

IMG_0185I had to wait for another afternoon to paint the body of the dresser, but I did so in the same exact manner.  Nothin’ to it.  Note that I did not paint the inside of the drawers and I also skipped painting the inside of the dresser.  Eventually, I’d like to add some contact paper with a graphic design or some decoupage paper to the inside of the drawers, but that’s a whole other project and an entirely different post!

3.   New Hardware

After I was done with the paint job, I didn’t want to keep it in the garage anymore.  It was too pretty and I didn’t want it getting dusty again, nor did I want to risk bicycle handles or recycling bins being scraped against it.  So, I brought it inside to finish the next couple of steps.

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I went to the craft & hobby store and picked out some new hardware.  I normally would never have spent $10/pull, but since I dug this baby out of the trash, I felt that I could splurge on exactly what I wanted for the hardware.  That’s the beauty of these kinds of projects!  If you don’t want to shell out that much dough for hardware, the thrift store and flea markets are terrific resources for finding bags of old hardware removed from furniture.  There are so many ways to update old metal hardware.  Pinterest is a great resource for ideas on that topic.

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Unfortunately, when I got the new drawer pulls home, the holes in the drawers
didn’t line up.  So I measured and broke out my trusty cordless drill and made pilot holes exactly where I needed them.  Then, I simply screwed on the little bolts that came with the hardware, stood back, and admired the new look!  yellow painted dresser
4.  Seal

The last step…and I actually should have done this BEFORE I put the hardware on…was to seal my lemony yellow masterpiece with a topcoat of some kind.  I am loving CeCe Caldwell’s clear wax these days.  I’ve sealed and buffed the top and the drawer fronts, but I haven’t gotten around to doing the sides yet.  Most of the projects around my home are usually not 100% complete.  What can I say?  It’ll nag at me long enough and I’ll eventually get around to it.

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5.  Wax the Drawers

This last step was sort of unexpected. You see, after painting the drawer sides, the drawers didn’t slide in and out very smoothly due to friction.  They were hard to pull open and it got pretty annoying really quick.  So, I grabbed a regular white wax candle stick and rubbed it on the sides of the drawers and on the runners inside the dresser.  Perfecto!  This is a trick that you can use for sticky wooden windows too.

 

Now, my husband has somewhere to store his growing Yankee Candle collection!  Yes, he has one.  Don’t ask questions.  I love that he has a feminine side.  I highly doubt any of his friends read my blog, so I think his secret’s safe.  I use the other drawers to store the kids’ sunscreen, sunglasses, and bug spray for easy access when running out of the door, and extra lap blankets for movie nights.

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{DIY Chalkboard Using an Old Frame}

DIY Chalkboard Using an Old Frame at One Cozy NestHello friends and lovers of all things painted. In today’s post, I’ll take you through a step-by-step tutorial for making your very own chalkboard, from scratch, out of an old frame. So grab a cozy seat and relax!

If you recall, a recent trash pickin’ session yielded a great looking old frame. Since the glass or mirror was missing, I immediately knew what I’d do with it. I’m sure a lot of you can relate to things lying around your house with no particular plan, and then all of a sudden it hits you. It could be weeks, months, or even years! Well, I was happy to have an instant vision with this piece. I’ve been seeing so many wonderful chalkboard art projects on Pinterest lately and I’ve been dying to try my hand at one.

This chalkboard piece was all about firsts. For starters, the day I nabbed the frame out of the trash was my son’s first trash picking experience. It was my first time making a chalkboard from scratch. It was my first time using my jig saw AND it was my first time testing out my brand new nail gun, which I ended up not using because the nails I had were too long for this application. Still, I got some practice and some confidence to use it on another project. I have a small bookcase that I want to transform into a dollhouse for my daughter, like this one over at Bliss Images.  Lastly, it was my first time using milk paint.  I’ve used latex and chalk before, but never milk.  So I figured I’d give it a try to see what all the hype is about!  The nice folks over at General Finishes sent me these products to try:

General Finishes Waterbased Milk Paint at One Cozy Nest

{Tutorial:  DIY Chalkboard Using an Old Frame}

The only material that I had to buy off of the supply list was the plywood for the chalkboard. I already had the rest of the materials at home, so essentially, this project cost me less than $4. I realize some of you don’t have a basement full of craft supplies, but these items can be purchased inexpensively at your local craft (use your 50% off coupons!) or hardware store…or borrowed from your father-in-law or neighbor. No need to go buying a whole box of nails when there’s a workshop full of things down the street at your disposal! Take advantage and save $$ where you can.

Supply List:

  • Old frame
  • 2’X2’ ¼” thick hardwood plywood (get the smoothest one you can find)
  • Chalkboard paint (not to be confused with chalk paint)
  • Sponge brushes (you could get away with using one if you clean it out really well between colors)
  • 2” wide paint brush if you prefer over the sponge variety
  • Dark base color paint, light top color paint, and a clear top coat to protect/seal the piece
  • Sandpaper (fine grit and medium grit)
  • Wood glue
  • Finish nails
  • ChalkDIY Chalkboard Using an Old Frame at One Cozy Nest

1. Prep your piece.  Grab an old frame that you love the look of, but aren’t totally in love with what’s inside. It could be a frame that you found on trash day like I did, or a picture that’s been sitting in your garage or attic for years. Get it out and give it a good wiping with a soft cloth and warm soapy water. Don’t get it too wet, just use a damp cloth. Let it dry completely before painting. Sand down any rough edges or paint drips or bird poop or dead crusty dried up worms. True story. Hey, don’t judge. It happens. That’s why they invented rubber gloves…and antibacterial soap.DIY Chalkboard Using an Old Frame at One Cozy Nest

General Finishes Milk Paint in Dark Chocolate

  1. Paint your base coat(s). Stir your paint well (do not shake) and use your sponge brush topaint one light coat of your base color. For this multi-layered paint look, I used a dark base coat that was the color of dark chocolate. Is it weird that my mouth watered a little bit when I opened the can? It’s from the General Finishes line of Waterbased Milk Paint and the color is called….wait for it…..Dark Chocolate. I immediately craved a tall glass of ice cold chocolate milk. General Finishes Dark Chocolate Milk Paint at One Cozy Nest

{Painting Tips}

  • Don’t saturate your brush, just get it wet enough. This prevents lots of messy drips.
  • Brush in the same direction as the grain of the wood. This frame had wood going in two directions.
  • Put the first coat on lightly and go heavier on subsequent coats.
  • Don’t’ forget about the sides! Also, some people l like to paint the backs of their pieces (especially furniture) with one light coat of paint to tie it all together, but since this is definitely going against a wall, I opted not to paint the back. No need to waste paint.
  • Allow each coat to dry according to manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Place a fan near your painted pieces to speed the drying time up a little.

multi-tasking at One Cozy NestMy middle name is multi-task, so I frequently catch up on laundry or dishes, or help with homework in between coats of paint. Sometimes….er…most of the time, my projects sit unfinished for days or weeks if I can’t find enough solid blocks of time. Let’s face it. I’m a working mom of two so it is RARE that I get solid blocks of time. I don’t put too much pressure on myself. I just get it done when I can.  Here is my Right Hand Girl in action…always willing to help with chores in her own special way.  One day this area will look like one of those Pinterest-worthy laundry room makeovers.  Oh, come on!  A girl can dream, RIGHT?!

  1. Paint your top coat(s). I painted two top coats using General Finished Waterbased Milk Paint in Linen the same way I painted the base coat in the previous step. Don’t worry about totally covering up that lovely dark chocolate color. You’ll be strategically sanding the white away to reveal it in all the right places.

distressed edges at One Cozy NestCarved detail on mirror frame at One Cozy Nest

  1. Age your piece. After you are sure your piece is totally dry, it’s not time to age it to give it that vintage, time-worn look, as seen above . When I do this, I try to imagine how the piece wasused, where people would touch it frequently, rub against it or past it, etc. Obviously the corners and around the edges of the wood should get special attention. You also want to accentuate any special details in your frame. This piece has the cute little cut-out at the top, but you may be working with a frame that has beautiful carved details. You’ll want to sand there to bring out the darker base coat and highlight the beauty of the frame.DIY Chalkboard Using an Old Frame at One Cozy NestDIY Chalkboard Using an Old Frame at One Cozy Nest

Don’t go berserk with the sandpaper here. You don’t want to totally remove your top AND base coat! Just sand until you see the dark peeking through. You can always go back and sand some more after you’ve stepped back and take a good look at it. It’s much more difficult to re-paint it and start over! I first tried to sand with a fine grit but noticed it wasn’t doing the job. With chalk paint, fine grit usually works, but with this milk paint, I needed something more rough.  So, I moved on up to a medium grit and I got a much better result.DIY Chalkboard Using an Old Frame at One Cozy Nest

  1. WALK AWAY. Look at your piece from afar.Assess your first go-round of distressing. Does it look too intentional? Does the paint job look too “new” and even still? Sand some more, being sure you get the edges and details without making it look like you’re trying too hard to make it look old. I have seen too many pieces online where people distress in a pretty obvious pattern. This is a technique that you’ll get better at the more you do it. I’m no expert by any means, but the more practice you have, the more you just know when to stop and walk away from the piece.  Save your top coat for the very last step, after you have inserted the chalkboard.DIY Chalkboard Using an Old Frame at One Cozy Nest
  1. Measure & cut your wood. Measure the opening where the wood will sit…NOT the opening of the front of the frame. Turn your frame over and measure the inside opening on the back. There should be a little ledge that prevents the glass/mirror/chalkboard from falling through to the front.  Measure twice, cut once! Use a jig saw or a circular saw to cut your board down to size.

jig saw

{Tool Tip}

When first starting out on DIY projects, your best bet is to borrow tools from family, neighbors, or friends. Eventually, if you find that you absolutely need your own, yard sales are excellent sources. I nabbed a miter box and this jig saw, complete with the original box and instructions for a whopping $3 last year at my local city-wide yard sale. Once I turn professional blogger/DIYer/Home Improvement Show host (wink wink), I’ll go ahead and buy my own heavy duty, top o’ the line tools. For now, though, my father-in-law’s garage and shed are my playground!  I just load my project into my 31 Bag and carry it down the street (my in-laws live 5 houses down).31 Bag for Toting Craft Projects at One Cozy NestIMG_9197

  1. Prep your chalkboard. Wipe it clean of any saw dust. If you need to, fill in any knots or blemishes with wood filler. This board came already filled in. This one knot looks like a cute little bear head, doesn’t it?! wood knot bear or foxThe next time I make a chalkboard, I will likely use a man-made board toavoid this step and to avoid seeing the wood grain in the finished product. No big deal though, just a minor irritation. I’m a perfectionist even when trying to make something look imperfect! I have issues, I know.IMG_9191
  1. Paint your chalkboard. Going with the grain of the wood, paint one light coat of black chalkboard paint. Not chalk paint, actual chalkboard paint made for chalkboards. IMG_9189IMG_9182I bought an inexpensive kind at the craft store, but they sell more high-end brands at your hardware store. I’m sure there are Pinterest tutorials on how to make your own! Let dry. Add more coats as desired. I painted this with three coats. If you want and happen to have it on hand, a primer could be painted on first, then the chalkboard paint.

{Tool Tip}

Always keep a roll of plastic wrap in your workspace.  Wrap up your brushes tightly in between coats so they don’t dry out.  This trick works overnight too!wrap paint brushes up with plastic wrap in between coats at One Cozy Nest

  1. Assemble your chalkboard. Lay a small bead of wood glue around the edges of the inside ledge of the frame. wood glueThis is just an “extra” so the chalkboard doesn’t move or wiggle in the frame when you’re writing on it. Then using small finish nails, secure the board in the frame by nailing them as close to the board as possible. IMG_9228Do not hammer them in all the way.You want the nails to act as stoppers. I placed the frame, face side down on a piece of clean cardboard, then loaded up the back with some heavy stuff from around the garage to make sure the wood glue had good contact with the chalkboard. Makesure no wood glue blobs came out on the other side onto your chalkboard. Placing a small bead will avoid this….so don’t go nuts with that either. I left this overnight.
  1. Paint your topcoat. The next day I used blue painters tape to protect the chalkboard and I painted two coats of General Finishes Waterbased High Performance Top Coat to protect the piece and seal all that vintage-y goodness in. Let dry.
  1. Season your chalkboard. Have you ever seasoned an iron skillet or a wood chopping block? Well, if you don’t season a brand new chalkboard, the first thing you write on it will be “burned” into the paint and will be hard to erase. IMG_9265Chalkboard paint is porous, so you need to fill in all the tiny nooks and crannies with chalk dust. To do this, take a stick of chalk, lay it flat, and cover the entire board in one direction. Then the other direction. I went a step further and colored it in diagonally and scribbled into any spots that looked like it wasn’t accepting the chalk well.  Wipe the chalkboard free of all chalk, using a dry cloth or chalkboard eraser and you’re ready to start expressing your deep thoughts to the world…or telling your husband that you need milk and bread.IMG_9109
  2. This piece already had screws in the back for hanging but I need to add some wire. An alternative hanging method that I love is using removable strips that won’t damage your walls if you decide to move the chalkboard to a different location.DIY_Chalkboard4
  3. Use bakers twine, cotton string, or jute string to tie a fresh piece of chalk to your chalkboard so it’s always on hand. You never know when an inspirational quote like this one will hit you.DIY Chalkboard Using an Old Frame ~ One Cozy Nest ~ Chalkboard Art

 

 As Always, Stay Cozy,

Mandy

xxxooo

{Mommy, This is Crazy}

One night, the family and I were on our way to a good friend’s house for dinner. It happened to be….the eve of trash day. We rounded a corner and my headlights caught the outline of what appeared to be a dresser. IMG_8641My head spun to the right and I pointed it out to my husband at the same time his head was spinning to the left pointing something else out to ME. I promptly turned the car around, nearly Nascar-style, surprising both kids in the back seat. I pulled up to the first pile of trash and stepped out of the car. My 7-year-old nervously called out the window, “Mommy, what are you doing?! I don’t think they want you to do that!” To which I responded, “It’s okay, bud, it’s called trash picking. They don’t want it!” Clearly this was his first time and he probably felt like we were stealing. I quickly surveyed a vanity and noticed it was missing 2 out of 3 drawers. It had nice lines though, and wasn’t completely wrecked, so I popped the trunk and shoved it in, thinking that I could build shelves inside the nooks where the drawers once were. My husband told me to also nab a IMG_9103pretty shabby looking empty frame. Good eye, hubs. Since I had the stroller in the back, the trunk wouldn’t close all the way, which added to my son’s anxiety over the whole situation. He says, “Mommy this is crazy!” I said, “This isn’t crazy, it’s FREE!”

The next pile we pulled up to had the lovely dresser that caught my eye. It wasn’t exactly my personal taste, but it looked like it was in great shape…and it was. Not a knick or scratch, and it was pretty clean to boot. It was a natural-colored pencil rattan piece with 6 drawers and a matching mirror. I pulled out all of the drawers to make sure they were all on track. I’m not experienced with furniture repair yet, so right now I need my pieces to be in pretty decent working order from the start. I’m sure I’ll learn some new tricks along the way though.

Obviously, with the trunk of my 4-door Honda already flapping open, we couldn’t load anything of that size even if we wanted to. But the friend whose house we were headed to owns a pickup truck. I’ll just ask him! Unfortunately, he flat out said no when I asked. Apparently he shares the same opinion of “crazy” with my son. What good is a friend with a truck if he won’t let you use it to pick through his neighbor’s trash? The nerve. So, I gave up on the dresser idea and was content with the vanity and frame. IMG_8590However on the drive home, we passed it again, looking all lonely on the curb. I called my father-in-law as soon as we got home and asked, “Are you busy right now? Wanna go for a drive?” His response sums up exactly why I love him so much. “Sure, where to?” 20 minutes later, we had that baby and its matching mirror in the back of his truck and were headed home to put it in my garage.

Over the next few weeks, walking past it over and over again, it started growing on me. Sure, it wasn’t immediately my personal taste, but then again, I don’t think I have a narrowed-down style. I describe it as vintage eclectic. I fill my home with things that make me happy and colors that I love so naturally, it’s not going to look like I ordered it straight out of a catalog.

So while I decided what color to paint it, I brought it into the house and put it in its spot to see how it felt. I like it even more now. I think I’m going to go with a nice bright yellow to compliment some of my existing family room accessories and to tie the room together with the adjacent office/playroom.IMG_4249

It’s the perfect height to rest a cup of coffee while lounging on the recliner. It’s also a nice home to my vintage aqua blue radio.  I’ll decorate it more thoughtfully with my eclectic little happy things once it’s all complete.  I’ll have to decide whether to paint the existing mirror to match or to swap it out for the one I picked out of the trash. However, putting the two together might look too matchy-matchy for my liking. For now, it looks great where it is. I have big plans for those drawers too. IMG_8601With little kiddos in the house and small closets, drawers are this mom’s best friend. One of them will definitely be housing my husband’s growing collection of Yankee Candles…his guilty pleasure. You’d never think a 6’3” man who drives a snow plow in the Winter would have such a soft side. He’s my big softy.

Stay tuned for the reveal of the dresser! That will get it’s own step-by-step post filled with lots of photos. By subscribing to my blog and connecting with me on FacebookPinterest, and Twitter, you won’t miss a thing!

What “crazy” things have you done in the name of creativity? What have you done that made your kids have mini panic attacks or cover their faces in shame? Visions of two legs sticking up out of a dumpster come to mind…leave a comment below, I’d love to hear about your experiences!

As Always, Stay Cozy!

Mandy

xxxooo

{Telephone Table Turned Charging Station}

telephone_tableI just finished this lovely little piece.  I transformed it into a convenient charging station by simply adding a 1″-diameter hole in the back.  The previous owner painted the table a pea-green and in some areas that were lightly distressed, you can see it peeking through.  It was coated in natural wax and buffed to a nice sheen.  It’s listed for sale in my Etsy shop, One Cozy Nest Vintage.

Here, you can see the details:

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{On the workbench at One Cozy Nest}

beforeTonight’s project is something I picked up months ago at a local barn sale that my husband and I frequent.  It’s a small green accent table that was used as a little message center…back when telephone books needed a place to live besides your recycling bin.  Well, at least that’s where mine lives!  I have a little obsession with telephone tables.  I bought one in 1999 at a roadside yard sale for my very first apartment.  It was the kind that had the bench attached, though.  It was symbolic, in a way, as it was my first purchase towards independent living…flying the coop.  It was very useful for a while, but I ended up letting it go after I moved into my first house and began my “grown-up” decorating.  After I placed it on the curb outside my home, I hoped someone would snatch it up.  Well, later that day, I saw it on the side of a neighbor’s garage.  I hope it found a good loving home!

The green on the table was not exactly eye-catching, so I wanted to turn up the color dial a little….well, a lot.  So I decided to give it a nice coating of CeCe Caldwell’s Emerald Isle green chalk paint.  Wow!  Holy cow, is that bold.  I like it.  I’ll add some glaze or wax to add some dimension to the piece, but for now, I wanted to show you the first stages.  I drilled a One Cozy Nest uses CeCe Caldwell's Emerald Isle green chalk and clay paintnice one-inch hole in the back so that I can market it for use as a charging station and message center.  No one uses phone books anymore, do they?  So the little shelf is perfect for all those new-fangled devices us young whipper-snappers are using these days! I’ll be sure to update you on the progress complete with before and after photos and techniques.

As always, stay cozy!

Mandy

{Weekend Makeover ~ Chippy Toy Chest Turned End Table}

One of my Shupp’s Grove picks this year, during my annual Sister’s Getaway Weekend, was this awesome aqua blue (my favorite color) side table, made out of reclaimed wood.  The vendor told me it came from her uncle’s house and that they used it as a toy box when they were kids.  The top is hinged and opens to reveal a roomy spot to put lots of stuff into….I’ve got 2 kids so the possibilities are endless!




I love how you can see the wear and tear on the legs and the top (not pictured), where the tiny little hands flipped it open over and over again.  What’s also interesting is all of the different kinds of bolts, nails, and screws that were used to put it together.  No leg is attached in the same manner, but it’s a sturdy little piece!  One sunny weekend, my son helped me wash the dirt and grime off of it.  Then I sanded it down using a palm sander on another very windy day.   Thank goodness for the wind because it made me feel better about the possibility of the paint containing lead.  The huge gusts of wind whisked it all away!  

I wanted it to go in this spot…where an old stationery cabinet used to sit. That piece was purchased at a local barn sale.  The drawers don’t come out too easily, but they work well enough to store seasonal items in it like sunscreen, sunglasses, and odds and ends like cell phone chargers and stuff like that.


I am contemplating repainting the front of my chippy aqua blue toy chest because some funky drip marks did not sand out like I thought they would.  I doubt I’ll find an exact match to the paint, but I can sure try.  I’m considering using my new supply of CeCe Caldwell Chalk and Clay paint.  I’ll post about that project if I ever get around to it.  Then, I’ll apply a coat of finishing wax to seal in the paint completely and protect it.  

So, here it now sits in my family room.  I’m still deciding if I like it there.  It’s quite a bit smaller than I imagined it to be.  

Now, my West Elm hack owl lamp has a new home where he can be seen a little better than in his last home, all tucked into the corner on the opposite side of our grey sectional couch.  I bought an ugly semi-realistic looking owl lamp complete with creepy, bright yellow eyes.  I spray painted it bright white.  It cost about $35 as opposed to the very costly brand new one at West Elm.  
Well, I hope you enjoyed hearing about some of my projects.  
As always, stay cozy!
Mandy

{Curbside Rescue ~ Oak Parlor Table}

Hi there!  I am proud to say that I am finished with my very first chalk paint project.  I started with a solid oak parlor table with cast metal ball & claw feet that my sister rescued from someone’s trash pile in her neighborhood.


I purchased CeCe Caldwell clay and chalk paints from Foxy Finds at the Bucks County Antique Gallery in Chalfont, PA as well as online at Glitterfarm.com.  Not only is this paint earth friendly, it has no odor.  No harmful VOCs that are bad for your health, safe for pets and kids.  Perfect for this tree-huggin’ mama.

It got two coats of Santa Fe Turquoise and then I distressed it lightly using a damp cloth.  That’s the beauty of this paint…so little effort is needed to distress your pieces in just the right areas.  You can also use a fine grit sand paper, but a cloth works just as nice.

Next, I cleaned up the glass ball feet and the cast metal claws got a good scrubbing with a microfiber cloth soaked in warm water and TSP.  After they dried, I used some antique gold Rub ‘n Buff on the metal and they came out so gorgeous!

I wanted to tone down the brightness of the turquoise color of the table.  It’s my favorite color, but it was almost too vibrant for this piece.  So, I figured a glaze was a good option.  I mixed up a few batches of tinted glaze using a smidgeon of some of the colors I bought from Glitter Farm, dropped into cups of clear glaze.  I then tested each of them on a long wooden stake that I painted turquoise, just to see which effect I liked the most.  The winner was Virginia Chestnut.  Just a touch of paint gets added to the glaze if you want a subtle glaze…more gets added if you want to be more dramatic.  I really liked experimenting with these.  That’s the scientist in me, I guess!  The light colored stain was perfect to tone down the turquoise, but allow enough to show through.  
Here you can see the glaze on top of the turquoise color.  It gave a really nice aged look to it.  
The final stages happened on my kitchen table one night after the kids went to bed.  Jeff was in the office/playroom next door listening to some awful political talk show and I just wanted to shoot myself.  I love the man to pieces, but his taste in entertainment sometimes makes me cringe.  Next time I decide to do a project within earshot of said political talk show, my iPod is comin’ out.  Jeff and I are complete opposites on a couple of very important issues (politics & religion), but somehow we make it work.  Definitely makes for some interesting discussions, most of which I try to avoid altogether.  🙂    

Just a side note…..see those chairs and table in the photo above?  My next project is painting those in CeCe Caldwell’s Vintage White and recovering the seat pads with red & white gingham oil cloth that is totally and completely wipeable!  Who’s idea was it to cover kitchen chairs in fabric???  I scored the whole set, solid wood with a durable formica top, 6 padded ladder back chairs, and two leaves.  All for $150.  Not too bad, huh?  The set will replace our old counter-height set seen here:

See that light fixture with the one light bulb blown out?  It’s going as well.  I ordered a vintage looking porcelain enamel pendant light from Barn Light Electric in jade green to go over the table as well as one for over our sink.  I cannot wait until I have the time to install those babies!

Okay, back to my table project.  The final steps were coating the table top and lower shelf in four coats of Endurance finish to protect the surface from scratches, etc.  It’s extremely durable.  The legs got 2 coats of Satin finish.  There you have it, my friends!  My first furniture painting experience.  I think it was quite the success, don’t you?  It will be available for sale at Home Fine Art at the Mill Race Village in Historic Mt. Holly, NJ where my lovely talented sister is a member and also sells her artwork.  Take a trip and check it out.  There are lots of other shops there too.